Friday, 21 October 2016

SHELLEY’S CRIMSONWING; THE BIRDS OF UGANDA – UGANDA SAFARI NEWS

shelleys-crimsonwingWith over 1057 species of birds, the birding safaris and tours in Uganda go beyond the ordinary. Among these species of birds, there is the eye catching Shelley’s Crimsonwing scientifically referred as Cryptospiza Shelleyi.
The Shelley’s Crimsonwing is categorized among the estrildid finch species thrives in closed canopy moist forests, close to water valley bottoms, low secondary growth at the edges of forests, glades and forest clearings marked by extensive herbs, moorland and Bamboo thickets. The birders on Uganda safaris can explore the Shelley Crimsonwing in the Mountains of the Albertine rift valley including Rwenzori Mountains. This Species stretch to other famous parts in the region including the Virunga Mountains, the Kahuzi Biega Mountain, Itombwe Mountain as explored on Congo Safaris and tours and Nyungwe Forest National Park and Gishwati Mukura National Park as explored on Safaris in Rwanda.
Bwindi Impenetrable National Park to the south west of Uganda is also known to shelter this species presenting an opportunity for the world travelers on gorilla safaris and tours in Uganda to as well engage in birding especially in the eastern sector of Ruhija.
The Shelley Crimsonwing is marked with bright colors at low levels and can stretch to 13cm in length.  The distinction exists between the male and female Shelley Crimsonwing.  The female has an olive head and red color on the rump and mantle while the male have bright red crown, back and face along with contrasting black tail and wings not forgetting Olive yellow underparts. The two sexes feature bright red bills.  These unique features make it very fascinating to view on birding safaris in Uganda and Rwanda.
Regarding conservation, the Shelley Crimsonwing is listed as Vulnerable due to increasing habitat loss which has in turn affected their populations. The cases of deforestation and degradation of forests as people attempt to secure more land for agriculture, timber extraction and mining.

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